Samuel Lin• Timely Word •

The Masks We Wear

By 3 November 2019 November 14th, 2019 No Comments

All of us wear masks; the only difference is whether or not we realize it or not. Society has taught us from a young age that masks are necessary. We learn to put on masks to so that others do not see us as weak or imperfect. We discover that we can don a mask to give the illusion of something we are not. We get the hang of wearing certain masks to function according to what expected of us.

We put on a “I’m ok” mask before a loved one so that they need not worry about us.

We switch out to various “Roles and Responsibilities” masks as expected of us when we have tasks on hand.

We use our “Act blur” mask when we encounter something we do not want to be part of.

We equip on our “Angry” mask when we think the world does not accept and love us.

We change into the “Chameleon” mask when we want the approval of our friends.

We use our “Fake it” mask when we want show that we have made it in life.

We hide behind a “Power” mask and bully others when we are insecure in our position.

However, the fact of the matter is that we were not born with a mask on. It is something that we are taught to put on. This means that we can take it off! Authenticity brings freedom and is a crucial step towards being Christ-like. Furthermore, if we desire to be a safe and authentic grace community where all can “come as they are” without a need to put on a façade or wear a mask, we need to take off our masks.

It is unnerving, because it makes us so vulnerable. Romans 5:8 reminds us that “God shows His love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” He loved us even while we were sinners. God accepted us for who we were. How liberating is that?

So take off your mask and break the silence, so that you may experience healing and find freedom. Let us embrace each other as God’s workmanship that is still a work-in-progress. May we experience God’s redemptive work in each other’s lives as we.

By Samuel Lin, Pastoral Staff (YCKC Bulletin 3 November 2019)